Nepal’s Nomadic Rautes Changing Their Way Of Life: For Good Or Bad?

Feb.11, 2014

Nepalgunj

Rautes, who have been living in forests for centuries, are now changing their way of living. The standards of this nomadic tribe are also improving with changes in their food and dressing. They had been living in forests and eating forest edibles but are coming in contact with other communities these days. Raute Chief

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[PETITION] INDIA: Priyanka Chopra WITHDRAW from VEDANTA’s ‘Our Girls, Our Pride’ Campaign

“We, ask you to withdraw as Ambassador from ‘Our Girls, Our Pride’, a discredited and damaging campaign and not lend your name to it , when its partner , Vedanta has a terrible record on human rights and the environment,they are destroying the lives of thousands of girl children in Odisha, Chhattisgarh and other states of India and its crimes have been exposed across India and internationally. Vedanta’s interests are directly opposed to those of India, its people and particularly the girl children from poor communities it claims to be helping. Countless children’s life chances have been affected by the deaths and serious injuries sustained by their parents who are workers in Vedanta’s mines, factories and other processing operations.Let them not use you and your name for cause that’s a sham and a PR exercise, for a brand like vedanta which has soaked their hands in blood of tribals of Niymagiri, including girl child.”
 
SIGN THE PETITION HERE AT AVAAZ.ORG.

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INDIA: Land ownership boosts climate resilience in India

11 Mar 2012 21:26

Source: Alertnet // Manipadma Jena

Despite water shortages, Chilipoi village women with their own small homestead plots are able to grow enough vegetables to feed their families. ALERTNET/Manipadma Jena

By Manipadma Jena

GANJAM, India (AlertNet) – Efforts to secure land ownership for tribal people in one of India’s poorest states are bolstering their economic security in the face of climate-induced hardships, and helping conserve farmland and forest.

In the hamlet of Kharibandh in Ganjam, a coastal district in the eastern state of Orissa (now officially called Odisha), 13 households of the Sabar tribal community each received title to 400 square metres (0.1 acres) of government land two years ago. The families had lived in Kharibandh for three generations, but had no legal right to the land.

Today, Rabibari Sabar, a 51-year-old widow, pedals vigorously on a foot pump to pipe pond water into her plot of seasonal vegetables interspersed with coconut and papaya trees. As well as feeding her family, she earned 1,500 rupees ($30) last year selling tubers and spinach from her homestead farm to neighbouring villagers. More

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