Report on Human Rights Situation of Indigenous Peoples in Bangladesh in 2013

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Bangladesh often affirms its commitment to promote and protect human rights through its unequivocal pledge to uphold the principles and purposes of the UN Charter, international peace and security, respect for international law and rejection of colonialism and racism. However, different state agencies of Bangladesh have been directly engaged in interfering with the enjoyment of the human rights of indigenous peoples enshrined in the international laws for long, let alone the state authorities preventing violations of these rights by state agencies and other non-state actors. During the second cycle of review under the UPR mechanism on Bangladesh held at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on 29 April 2013, for example, the government of Bangladesh provided incomplete and inaccurate information on implementation of the CHT Accord and constitutional recognition of indigenous peoples to the UPR session, which has proved non-compliance attitude of government’s commitment to the international human rights mechanisms. More

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Indigenous resource management systems: A holistic approach to nature and livelihoods

Posted on March 14, 2012

Joint community rice harvesting by the Karen people in the highlands of northern Thailand.

By Dr. Maurizio Farhan-Ferrari, Environmental Governance Programme Coordinator
Forest Peoples Programme, Moreton-in-Marsh, UK

Two peer-reviewed studies published recently by the Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) and the World Bank show that strict conservation is less effective in reducing deforestation than community forests that are managed and controlled by indigenous peoples and forest-dependent communities within multiple use systems.

This article argues that indigenous resource management systems are not only well poised to reduce deforestation rates but also to provide a rich array of experiences, expertise, and practices that can significantly contribute to protecting biodiversity, food security, and sustainable livelihoods in indigenous communities, as well as finding answers to climate change challenges. More

BANGLADESH: Decision taken to amend the Land Commission Act and concerned authorities asked to take measures accordingly, says Dr. Rizvi

Discussion on Implementation of CHT Accord

Decision was taken to amend the Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) Land Dispute Resolution Commission Act 2001 and all concerned authorities were asked to take necessary measures as per decision, says Dr. Gowhar Rizvi, advisor to the Prime Minister on international affairs. He also added that there should be no doubt over the government’s commitment to implementing the CHT Accord.

Dr. Rizvi was speaking at a discussion titled “Implementation of the CHT Accord and Election Commitment of the Government: Achievement and Opportunities” jointly organised by Kapaeeng Foundation and the Association of Land Reform and Development (ALRD) at Cirdap auditorium in Dhaka. Retired justice Golam Rabbani presided over the discussion while Dr. Gowhar Rizvi was present as chief guest. More

Bangladesh: Amendment Of CHT Land Commission Act Within Current Session Of Parliament Demanded

On 1 March 2012 Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) regional chapter of Bangladesh Indigenous Peoples Forum (BIPF) organised human chain at the headquarters of three hill districts of CHT demanding amendment of the CHT Land Dispute Resolution Commission Act 2001 as per CHT Accord within on-going session of the Jatiya Sangsad (Parliament). Removal of Khademul Islam Chowdhury from his chairmanship of CHT Land Dispute Resolution Commission (CHTLDRC) for his controversial and illegal works was also demanded in this human chain.

In Rangamati, M N Larma Memorial Foundation and CHT Citizens’ Committee also participated in the human chain formed in front of the office of Rangamati Deputy Commissioner. Presided over by Prakriti Ranjan Chakma, convenor of CHT regional chapter of the BIPF, the human chain was conducted by Bodhi Satta Chakma, member-secretary of CHT regional chapter of the BIPF. More

BANGLADESH: Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) Land disputes hearing stalled

The Daily Star, Wednesday, February 29, 2012

CHT Land Commission

Hearing on land disputes stalled

Our Correspondent, Khagrachhari

A hearing of the CHT Land Dispute Resolution Commission in its Khagrachhari district town office yesterday was suspended due to a quorum crisis as the representatives of hill people in the commission were absent.

Only two members, commission chairman Justice (retd) Khademul Islam Chowdhury and Additional Divisional Commissioner Nurul Islam were present yesterday when 43 cases were set to be heard.

Representatives of the hill people in the committee, including CHT Regional Council Chairman Jyotirindra Bodhipriya Larma alias Santu Larma, Khagrachhari Hill District Council Chairman Kujendra Lal Tripura and Khagrachhari Circle Chief (Mong Raja) Saching Prue Chowdhury were absent at the first day’s hearing. The commission is set to sit again today. More

BANGLADESH: Open-pit coal mine project in Bangladesh threatens human rights – UN experts

Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food Olivier De Schutter. UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré

28 February 2012 –

The construction of an open-pit coal mine in Bangladeshcould displace hundreds of thousands of people and jeopardize their access to basic needs, a group of United Nations independent human rights experts warned today.“The Government of Bangladesh must ensure that any policy concerning open-pit coal mining includes robust safeguards to protect human rights. In the interim, the Phulbari coal mine should not be allowed to proceed because of the massive disruptions it is expected to cause,” the experts said in a statement.The group noted that if opened, the proposed mine would immediately displace an estimated 50,000 to 130,000 people, with up to 220,000 potentially being affected over time as irrigation channels and wells dry up.In addition, the project would reportedly extract 572 million tons of coal over the next 36 years from a site covering nearly 6,000 hectares, and destroy some 12,000 hectares of productive agricultural land. More

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