Report on Human Rights Situation of Indigenous Peoples in Bangladesh in 2013

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Bangladesh often affirms its commitment to promote and protect human rights through its unequivocal pledge to uphold the principles and purposes of the UN Charter, international peace and security, respect for international law and rejection of colonialism and racism. However, different state agencies of Bangladesh have been directly engaged in interfering with the enjoyment of the human rights of indigenous peoples enshrined in the international laws for long, let alone the state authorities preventing violations of these rights by state agencies and other non-state actors. During the second cycle of review under the UPR mechanism on Bangladesh held at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva on 29 April 2013, for example, the government of Bangladesh provided incomplete and inaccurate information on implementation of the CHT Accord and constitutional recognition of indigenous peoples to the UPR session, which has proved non-compliance attitude of government’s commitment to the international human rights mechanisms. More

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YFIN and IPRAN submit comments on Draft Youth Charter of SAARC

7 Oct 2013

In response to call for comments from Nepal’s Ministry of Youth and Sports, Youth Federation of Indigenous Nationalities (YFIN) Nepal and Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Activists Network (IPRAN) have today submitted comments on the draft of SAARC Youth Charter.

YFIN and IPRAN drew particular attention of the Ministry to the following issues with regards to the Charter :

  1. The Draft Charter largely ignores the diversity of peoples, and hence the youth, in SAARC region. We are particularly concerned about non-recognition of disadvantaged and marginalized groups in the region, including indigenous and tribal peoples, Dalits, sexual minorities, persons with disability, linguistic and religious minorities, among others, in the Draft. Youth from these groups have distinct identity than other youth and have specific needs arising from long-standing marginalization, discrimination, exclusion and oppression against those groups. Thus, we highly suggest, as reflected in our comments, that the Draft obliges State Parties to recognize such diversity, distinct identities of groups and their specific needs and take targeted actions to address those needs.
  2. Further, the Draft Charter proposes for a national mechanism for the implementation of the Charter and a Youth Plan of Action to operationalize the provisions of the Charter. We strongly emphasize that such mechanism and plan of action should ensure full, effective, meaningful and inclusive representation and participation of youth from the country, including those from indigenous and tribal peoples and other disadvantaged and marginalized groups. More

Nepal’s slave girls

Can the young girls forced to work in middle class homes across the country break the bonds of slavery?

 Last Modified: 28 Sep 2013 14:34

Slavery is banned in Nepal. But hidden behind the walls of city homes, some still keep young girls as slaves called kamlaris.The girls are from the Tharu community, an indigenous group that was stripped of its land and forced into bonded labour after Nepal’s first social order was introduced 160 years ago. Tharus farm the land of their landlord and, in return, give back half of what they produce. Often, they trade away their daughters as well.

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In June 2013, kamlaris from all over the country protested in a bid to bring an end to slavery once and for all. They want to be free from servitude and have their basic rights guaranteed. The demonstrations were triggered by the mysterious death of Srijana, a 12-year-old kamlari girl who burnt to death in her owner’s house. The police alleged it was suicide but the kamlaris were not convinced.

The police retaliated against the demonstrators with violence. Political organisations and rights groups were conspicuously absent from their demonstrations. More

PHILIPPINES: CWEARC Celebrated its Gains in 25 years of Empowering Indigenous Women in the Cordillera

In time for the International Day of Toiling Women, on 8 March 2012, the Cordillera Women’s Education Action Research Center (CWEARC) celebrated its 25th year of partnership with women’s organizations in the Cordillera region particularly indigenous women in line with its mission of empowering indigenous women in the region.

The occasion was attended by 220 delegates from its local partners of women’s organizations, communities in the region, networks and allies. “Indeed, it was a reunion of women’s organizations and leaders that CWEARC partnered with in different periods of the 25 years of existence of CWEARC”, said Vernie Yocogan-Diano, current executive director of the Center. More

Indigenous Women: key actors in poverty and hunger eradication (UN CSW RESOLUTION E/CN.6/2012/L.6)

On 9 March 2012, the draft resolution entitled:  “Indigenous Women: key actors in poverty and hunger  eradication” (E/CN.6/2012/L.6) was adopted at the Commission on the Status of Women at its Fifty-sixth Session. To download the resolution, please click here.

Commission on the Status of Women

Fifty-sixth session
27 February-9 March 2012
Agenda item 3 (c)

 

Follow-up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and to the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly, entitled “Women 2000: gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century”: gender mainstreaming, situations and programmatic matters

Australia,* Argentina, Bolivia (Plurinational State of),* Ecuador,* El Salvador, Guatemala,* Mexico* and Nicaragua: draft resolution

 

Indigenous women: key actors in poverty and hunger eradication More

BANGLADESH: Jumma women in CHT suffering from insecurity due to non-implementation of CHT Accord, says Santu Larma

“We all expected an inspiring future by signing of Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT) Accord in 1997. However, all irrespective of men and women of CHT are still suffering from insecurity due to non-implementation of CHT Accord” says Jyotirindra Bodhipriya Larma alias Santu Larma, president of PCJSS and chairman of CHT Regional Council (CHTRC).

Mr. Larma said it at the discussion meeting organised by Parbatya Chattagram Mahila Samity (PCMS) (CHT Women’s Association) and Hill Women’s Federation (HWF) on the occasion of international women day on 8 March 2012 in Rangamati with the slogan ‘connecting girls, inspiring futures’, ‘ensuring a violence-free life for indigenous women’ and ‘strengthen CHT Accord implementation movement with a aim to establish equal dignity of Jumma women’. More

Indigenous groups suffer from higher rates of violence against women

Indigenous Women

From 18 to 20 January 2012, the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII) held an International Expert Group Meeting at UN Headquarters entitled “Combating violence against indigenous women and girls: Article 22 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.” This conference applied a human rights framework to the issue of gender‐ based violence faced by indigenous women, while contextualizing its global manifestations in the context of States’ responsibilities under international human rights law, as articulated in Article 22.2 of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP): “States shall take measures, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, to ensure that indigenous women and children enjoy the full protection and guarantees against all forms of violence and discrimination.”

Focusing especially on issues of policing and jurisdiction, as well as outlining anti‐violence strategies, the experts sought to articulate a holistic approach to addressing violence against women that recognizes indigenous peoples’ ongoing struggles for self‐determination in the face of multidimensional discrimination and socioeconomic disadvantages. The panel characterized violence against indigenous women and girls as a pervasive form of human rights abuse, while drawing attention to the contemporary and historical contexts of indigenous communities and identifying steps towards the enhancement of their capacities and rights. More

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